Today marks the 100th anniversary since Parliament gave women the right to vote

Welsh Conservative leader, Andrew RT Davies, reflects on the 100th anniversary since Parliament gave women the right to vote.

 

Commenting on the anniversary, Andrew said:

 

“What does the Conservative Party do for women? Well first and foremost we make them Prime Minister – and we’re proud of the Party’s history in electing two female leaders.

 

“Theresa May and the Conservative Party has a strong record of promoting women in politics. The first woman to sit in the House of Commons was a Conservative, and we were the first party in the western world to elect a female Prime Minister. Recently, we also had the first female Muslim minister speak at the House of Commons despatch box in Nusrat Ghani.

 

“The Prime Minister co-founded Women2Win, appointed a female Vice-Chair to head up our candidates department to look at how we can get more female candidates, and she is working hard in Government to give women greater financial security and ensure equal opportunities in the workplace – so there’s no glass ceiling – while leading the fight to end violence against women and girls.

 

“But as Welsh Conservatives we also acknowledge there is still so much more we can do – not just in politics but across society. We want to see more women in public life and we want to tackle burning injustices, wherever they exist, so people can achieve their true potential, whatever their gender.”

 

Touching upon on the important role of Welsh women in the battle for women’s suffrage and greater equality, Andrew added:

 

“Wales boasts a proud history in the struggle for women’s suffrage. In 1907, the first branch of the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies (NUWSS) in Wales was founded in Llandudno’s Cocoa House, with others in Rhyl, Conwy, and Bangor forming the following year.

 

“In 1913, the law-abiding and non-militant NUWSS embarked on a walking pilgrimage from Bangor all the way to London; a 266-mile journey which took three weeks to complete. Once there they joined other suffragists in Hyde Park and distributed over half a million leaflets setting out their aims. What a fierce sight they must have been.

 

Notes to editors:

 

The Conservatives have a proud record of promotion women in politics. The first woman to sit in the House of Commons was a Conservative, and we were the first party in the western world to elect a female Prime Minister.

 

Parliamentary and political firsts for Conservative women:

 

• 1919: First Member of Parliament to take seat (Nancy Astor)

• 1970: Deputy Speaker of the Commons (Betty Harvie Anderson)

• 1975: Leader of the Opposition (Margaret Thatcher)

• 1979: Prime Minister (Margaret Thatcher)

• 1981: Leader of the House of Lords (Janet Young)

• 2003: Youngest Assembly Member ever elected to the institution (Welsh Conservative Laura Anne Jones)

• 2010: Secretary of State for Wales (Cheryl Gillan)

• 2016: Lord Chancellor (Liz Truss)

• 2017: First female Muslim minister to speak at House of Commons despatch box (Nusrat Ghani)